Day of the Dead in Chapala–Lockdown 2020 Edition

This year Day of the Dead was a subdued celebration. The governor of Jalisco, the state in which Chapala is located, had ordered a limited lockdown once again because of covid. During the week, businesses could be open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. On weekends, only grocery stores could open with the same limited hours. Restaurants could deliver but accept no dine-in customers. Everyone was (and is) encouraged to stay home.

Lakeside in general has been pretty quiet. Little traffic; little activity. So when Day of the Dead arrived on November 2, a Monday this year, the cemeteries were closed and no public celebrations or memorials were allowed.

Normally, Day of the Dead is a colorful holiday with a somber undertone of remembering those who have passed. Its symbol is Catrina. Developed by a Mexican artist back at the turn of the prior century, Catrina have come to decorate and dominate the holiday. Part of the tradition of laughing in the face of death. A hint of defiance of the inevitable. I’ll live life anyway, I hear her say.

There were Catrinas in el centro.

This was as much of a public celebration as there was. Compare this to past years in my post here.

Even though the altars were not displayed in public in el centro, individuals and households still made their own declaration. Across the street from us, our neighbors honored one of their own.

And just down the street, my barber honored another.

In from of the newly-refurbished mercado in Chapala, the cabana too was decorated for the holiday.

Mexico is keeping calm and moving on. Day of the Dead will be back again next year, hopefully with a very public celebration in the spirit of facing life with equanimity. Here’s to it!