The Healthcare Experience in Chapala Mexico–Bonita’s Story Part 2

In Part 1 of this post, Bonita shared her journey with cancer and embarking on a vacation to Mexico for rest and investigation and the possibility of cancer treatment in Mexico.

Family voiced some trepidation about traveling and particularly traveling to Mexico. (Is it safe????)  Even so, we visited for two weeks as tourists on an informational quest, partly about cancer treatment in Mexico. We were wonderfully assisted along the way. One of our Air BnB hosts directed us to an insurance service that many expats in the Chapala-Ajijic area use. We also met with several agents at the Lake Chapala Society (an active group providing lots of local information to help expats learn the ropes).

We were dismayed to find that I am not insurable for cancer treatment in Mexico with my pre-existing condition. I would have to pay out-of-pocket for all cancer treatment. However, along with that “bad news” I was assisted by the insurance agent with Blue Angels to get an appointment with a local oncologist, in two days time nonetheless.

Dr. Diego Herrera works mostly in Guadalajara, yet visits a satellite clinic in Ajijic weekly. We had a very pleasant and informative visit. He assured me that I could receive the same treatment (chemo) that I was receiving stateside and was willing to get me a cost quotation to pay directly for the care.

This forty-five minute consultation cost me $40 (U.S.). I was greatly encouraged and began to correspond with Dr. Herrera via email periodically after we returned to Wisconsin to make additional preparations and further our “feasibility study.”

I was again very fortunate to learn that my employee “retired” insurance would reimburse me for cancer treatment in Mexico as long as it was consistent with my ongoing medical care (no “alternative clinics”). I would have to pay upfront, get the bills and medical records translated into English and U.S. dollars and be reimbursed rather than the doctor and clinic being paid directly by the insurer.

My U.S. doctor was very supportive of my decision to pursue treatment in Mexico. Once I got the dosages of the drugs from my WI provider–which was not as easy to do as I assumed it would be–I emailed that information to Dr. Herrera and within a week had my quote.

The treatment being provided in the U.S. at a cost of about $57,000 per month would cost about $15,000 (U.S.) in Mexico. A lot to pay out-of-pocket, but $40,000 less per month is substantial. The cost of the periodic scans I need to document response to therapy is $14,000 (U.S) in Wisconsin and $4,000 (U.S.) in Mexico.

I was very impressed with how much more transparent the pricing and billing is outside the U.S. In Mexico, all citizens have access to basic healthcare and treatment at state-owned facilities, for free. Those with better financial means can purchase affordable insurance with allows access to well-run private hospitals and clinics.

For expats, private insurance in Mexico is more affordable than the “affordable care act” coverage in the U.S. In the Chapala area, we can also purchase a clinic membership that allows full access to physician services in that clinic for about $300 (U.S.) a year. Lab tests, x-rays and pharmacy service are independently paid by the patient. For under $2,000 (U.S.) per year, an expat can buy more comprehensive coverage or catastrophic coverage.

To be continued.

 

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