The Healthcare Experience in Chapala Mexico–Bonita’s Story Part 3

In Part 1 of Bonita’s story here and Part 2 here, Bonita is diagnosed with ovarian cancer and begins treatment in the U.S. After a well-earned vacation in Mexico, we contemplated, debated and then planned a provisional move there. Here is the conclusion of her initial experience with healthcare in Mexico.

We decided that the stars were aligned for a six-month over the winter trial in Chapala. I hand-carried copies of my recent scan results and other pertinent medical records with me. We got to Chapala early in December (2017) and one week later with arrangements made via email, I met with Dr. Diego in his clinic in Guadalajara and received my first infusion in Mexico my first deep experience of healthcare in Mexico.

THe staff greet me by name at the reception desk and personally escorted me up to the consultation room. Dr. Diego spent a half-hour with me reviewing the records and discussing the treatment plan to ensure that ti was the same that I had been receiving stateside. He then escorted me to the modern treatment room and introduced me to the nurses and the pharmacist who would be administering the chemotherapy.

The pharmacist interviewed me for medication allergies and surgical history. The nurse checked my vita signs and noted that my blood pressure was slightly elevated. She notified the doctor and he came back into the treatment room to discuss this and rechecked my blood pressure. He gave the go-ahead to proceed with the treatment but advised me that he would be watching the blood pressure and that there might be a need for additional medications to control it. The drug was administered with flushes befor and after over an hour.

The nurses and the doctor checked with me every ten to fifteen minutes. I ad no conerns. My bloos pressure did not go higher so no additional medication was prescribed. There was a very clean and comfortable bathroom just around the corner from the infusion room. The recliner in the influsion room was powered by an electronic controller. There was no television (which I did not miss). They offered me a beverage.

After the infusion, I was escorted to the reception area to make payment. The bill was exactly as quoted ahead of time and they were fine with taking my U.S. Visa card. The doctor did explain to me that his portion of the bill–$100 (U.S.); $2,000 (Mexican Pesos)–he would prefer payment in cash in pesos on subsequent visits.

I requested him to prepare a bill in U.S. dollars and his notes translated for submission to my insurance company in the U.S. He took my insurance information and said that they would take care of it.

I left the clinic very pleased and comfortable. He said he would email me the appointment time for my next treatment in two weeks.

We’re off to a very good start with healthcare in Mexico.

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